Ensure every resident has the opportunity to make positive healthy choices, that San Diego County has fully optimized its health and social service delivery system and makes health, safety and thriving a focus of all policies and programs.

A STRONG FOUNDATION

FOR THE FUTURE

 

Healthy families make for healthy communities and that’s why it’s one of the County’s top priorities. But first, you must have the basic necessities.

 

The County helps eligible families and individuals get access to health care, nutrition and temporary financial aid. Medi-Cal helps cut the overall costs of health care, CalFresh assists them in buying food to improve their nutrition and CalWORKs helps them become more self-sufficient.

 

Getting services is sometimes a matter of where you live and the setting in which the services are provided. You are more likely to use them if they are located near you or in areas you frequently visit.

 

Eligibility workers are already in place at food banks to help people get nutrition assistance and health coverage.  Now when nurses with the Nurse Family Partnership make home visits they tell new and expectant moms about the good, nutritional benefits of both CalFresh and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and help them apply for those benefits.

 

First 5 San Diego’s home visiting program, First 5 First Steps, reached out to the refugee community in a culturally responsive way to help them navigate the different programs and services available in San Diego County. More than 1,860 home visits were made to approximately 90 refugee families.

 

No matter the circumstances, the County strives to give our youngest residents and their families strong roots so they’ll have what they need for lives that are healthy, safe and thriving.

 

Children at a Head Start program in El Cajon didn’t have to go anywhere for dental screenings. Through First 5 San Diego’s Oral Health Initiative, 122 children, ages 1 through 5, got dental exams on site. Nearly 60 percent of them went on to get recommended treatment.

 

The County wants our future adults to succeed so it’s giving young people the skills they need to be self-sufficient. For example, the UCCE 4-H program teaches kids skills in leadership, citizenship, science, healthy living, decision making and record keeping. Currently, 2,159 kids are participating in the program.

 

The Lakeside and Spring Valley teen centers offered 60 after-school programs. Middle and high school students had help with their homework and explored classes in arts and crafts, gardening, sports and more. The centers provided a positive social setting and mentors to help teens grow into strong adults.

 

And young people can’t succeed unless they’re in good health! County Library contributed to this by serving 24,928 free nutritious meals to youth over the summer.

 

For the foster youth in our care, Child Welfare Services implemented Permanency Roundtables. Teens at risk of leaving foster care without family support received professional consultations designed to help them make permanent lifelong connections so they can succeed in their adult lives. In the last year, there were 99 new and follow-up Permanency Roundtables.

HELPING THE HOMELESS AND

PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

 

The homeless and people with mental illness are among our region’s most vulnerable residents. The County works continuously to expand services to this group of people but this past year it went further; it joined local cities in creating Project One for All. This campaign is designed to help these individuals get the wraparound care they need to get off the streets.

 

The idea is to reach out to homeless people with serious mental illness who are eligible for supportive housing, find housing for them first and then provide treatment and other services. Project One for All is expected to help more than 1,800 people get a new start in life.

 

The County also added 17 new Psychiatric Emergency Response Teams (PERT). Now, any one of 40 teams can respond to 911 calls that involve a person with a psychiatric condition who is experiencing a life-threatening situation. Each team includes a specially trained officer or deputy and a mental health clinician. These teams responded to about 4,700 crisis situations this past year.

 

In-Home Outreach Teams (IHOT) work with adults who may have a serious mental illness but are resistant to receiving mental health services. This year, 152 participants successfully completed the IHOT program and were linked to needed services. Since the program began in 2011, the IHOT program has helped nearly 1,350 people.

 

The County implemented “Laura’s Law,” which provides court-ordered outpatient mental health services for people reluctant to get treatment.

 

County departments asked Housing and Community Development Services (HCDS) for tips on interacting with the homeless. As a result, HCDS created a training program to teach County employees how to relate to, and help, the homeless, either on the job or outside of work.

 

The Point-in-Time Count in 2016 showed 13 percent of the region’s homeless had served in the military. Even those who have received Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) vouchers from the County’s Housing Authority struggle to find a place to live because of historically low vacancy rates in the rental housing market. A landlord incentive program was put into effect. Landlords can apply for leasing bonuses for each unit newly leased to a veteran experiencing homelessness and also get financial help with security and utility deposits.

 

Veterans and the military community took center stage at the “Year of the Veteran” Board Conference in November 2015. The event capped a yearlong effort to get military help organizations from around the region to join forces to strengthen services for this population.

 

County Library also worked with the County’s Office of Military and Veterans Affairs (OMVA) to offer Vet Connect at two more library branches, this time in Poway and Alpine. Now veterans and family members in rural areas can file certain claims via a video teleconference instead of traveling in person to the OMVA in Kearny Mesa. Future Vet Connect sites include libraries in Borrego Springs, Imperial Beach and Valley Center.

More Accomplishments

HEALTHY FAMILIES

Ensure every resident has the opportunity to make positive healthy choices, that San Diego County has fully optimized its health and social service delivery system and makes health, safety and thriving a focus of all policies and programs.

SAFE COMMUNITIES

Make San Diego the safest and most resilient community in the nation, where youth are protected and the criminal justice system is balanced between accountability and rehabilitation.

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS

Strengthen the local economy through planning, development and infrastructure, protect San Diego’s natural and agricultural resources and promote opportunities for residents to engage in community life and civic activities.

 

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Promote continuous improvement in the organization through problem-solving, teamwork and leadership with a focus on customers’ needs and keeping employees positive and empowered.

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– Our Customers –

“She was courteous and treated me and my sister with common respect.”

 

Southeast Family Resource Center Client

July 2015

 

 

“The nurse, even more than an important professional, was like a friend who brought her support and understanding in many different areas.”

 

Nurse Family Partnership

Client

September 2015

 

 

“I want to give thanks to Mariana for being the BEST NURSE! My family and I are very thankful to have her in my daughter’s first 2 years of life! She’s made me grow and become a better mother.”

 

South Region Public Health Center Client

October 2015

 

 

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BY THE NUMBERS

Fiscal Year 2015-16

 

$177 million

Child Support

Collected

University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) taught

2,870 school children the importance of nutrition and physical activity for a healthy lifestyle.

58,950

Influenza

Vaccines

Distributed

Public assistance benefits, including cash, food assistance and health care benefits, were provided to low-income residents who met federal, state and/or local eligibility criteria.

745,254

Residents Received

Medi-Cal

292,643

Residents

Received CalFresh

63,146

Residents

Received CalWORKs

3,313

Residents

Received General Relief

73

Residents

Received County

Medi-Cal Services

2016 POINT-IN-TIME-COUNT

8,700

People

57

Percent

14

Percent

did not have a permanent home in San Diego County

were living

on the streets

of homeless on the streets had serious mental health conditions

Veterans Services assisted
7,258 veterans
with college tuition waivers.

 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY WEBSITE

COUNTY NEWS CENTER

® San Diego County // All Rights Reserved

A STRONG FOUNDATION

FOR THE FUTURE

 

Healthy families make for healthy communities and that’s why it’s one of the County’s top priorities. But first, you must have the basic necessities.

 

The County helps eligible families and individuals get access to health care, nutrition and temporary financial aid. Medi-Cal helps cut the overall costs of health care, CalFresh assists them in buying food to improve their nutrition and CalWORKs helps them become more self-sufficient.

 

Getting services is sometimes a matter of where you live and the setting in which the services are provided. You are more likely to use them if they are located near you or in areas you frequently visit.

 

Eligibility workers are already in place at food banks to help people get nutrition assistance and health coverage.  Now when nurses with the Nurse Family Partnership make home visits they tell new and expectant moms about the good, nutritional benefits of both CalFresh and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and help them apply for those benefits.

 

First 5 San Diego’s home visiting program, First 5 First Steps, reached out to the refugee community in a culturally responsive way to help them navigate the different programs and services available in San Diego County. More than 1,860 home visits were made to approximately 90 refugee families.

 

No matter the circumstances, the County strives to give our youngest residents and their families strong roots so they’ll have what they need for lives that are healthy, safe and thriving.

 

Children at a Head Start program in El Cajon didn’t have to go anywhere for dental screenings. Through First 5 San Diego’s Oral Health Initiative, 122 children, ages 1 through 5, got dental exams on site. Nearly 60 percent of them went on to get recommended treatment.

 

The County wants our future adults to succeed so it’s giving young people the skills they need to be self-sufficient. For example, the UCCE 4-H program teaches kids skills in leadership, citizenship, science, healthy living, decision making and record keeping. Currently, 2,159 kids are participating in the program.

 

The Lakeside and Spring Valley teen centers offered 60 after-school programs. Middle and high school students had help with their homework and explored classes in arts and crafts, gardening, sports and more. The centers provided a positive social setting and mentors to help teens grow into strong adults.

 

And young people can’t succeed unless they’re in good health! County Library contributed to this by serving 24,928 free nutritious meals to youth over the summer.

 

For the foster youth in our care, Child Welfare Services implemented Permanency Roundtables. Teens at risk of leaving foster care without family support received professional consultations designed to help them make permanent lifelong connections so they can succeed in their adult lives. In the last year, there were 99 new and follow-up Permanency Roundtables.